Tuesday, May 24, 2016

What ‘Youth’?


What ‘Youth’?

Part 1
Part 2
24 May 2016

Keiichi Matsuda | Augmented Reality Future



“We shape our tools, and thereafter our tools shape us.”
Marshall McLuhan

Less is More | Political Minimalism for a Digital Culture


It would be foolish not to recognize that the environment we swim in daily alters everything, not least politics.

The Wall Street Journal
by Daniel Henninger

What is going on with the American electorate? How have Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders gone so far by offering so little?

Everyone gets that these two campaigns are about varieties of anger. But something other than anger is changing America’s politics.

At the Trump campaign website, five policy positions are listed. Two are “Pay for the Wall” and “Immigration.” Other than trade with China, there is no entry on foreign policy.

Sen. Sanders’s campaign is essentially variations on several evocative phrases. Liberal analysts have debunked what little detail he has proposed as implausible, notably on health care.

And still: political minimalism is a winner in 2016.

Monday, May 23, 2016

Bob Dobbs & Derrick de Kerckhove Discuss the Schools of Media Ecology

Derrick de Kerckhove

Dobbstown

Reference:
Literary/Aesthetic Cliché-Probes in the American Classroom-Without-Walls by Bob Dobbs
Lecture with Derrick de Kerckhove

The Zappa Hour PLUS w/Roxana Flores Larrainzar, Bert Hill & Bob Dobbs


Payday
24 October 2015
Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6, Part 7

31 October 2015
Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6, Part 7, Part 8, Part 9, Part 10, Part 11, Part 12

7 November 2015
Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6, Part 7,

14 November 2015
Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6,

21 November 2015
Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6, Part 7, Part 8,

28 November 2015
Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6, Part 7, Part 8, Part 9, Part 10,

5 December 2015
Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6, Part 7, Part 8, Part 9 Part 10,

12 December 2015
Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6, Part 7,

19 December 2015
Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6, Part 7, Part 8, Part 9, Part 10, Part 11

26 December 2015
Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5

2 January 2016
Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4

9 January 2016
Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6, Part 7

16 January 2016
Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6, Part 7, Part 8

23 January 2016
Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6

30 January 2016
Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5

6 February 2016
Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6, Part 7, Part 8, Part 9

13 February 2016
Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6, Part 7, Part 8

20 February 2016
Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6

27 February 2016
Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5

12 March 2016
Part 1

19 March 2016
Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4

2 April 2016
Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6, Part 7, Part 8, Part 9

16 April 2016
Part 1, Part 2, Part 3

23 April 2016
Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6, Part 7

21 May 2016
Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4

Bob Dobbs Reviews William Irwin Thompson’s Intellectual Anticipation of iONdom


Payday
What ‘Youth’?

“Perhaps we are experiencing a shift from a world economy of competing and polluting industrial nation-states to a global ecology of noetic polities in which consciousness will become a symbiotic architecture of organisms and machines, one in which pollution is mined as a natural resource in a cultured bacterial technology and a complex ecology of ‘living machines’ and electronic organisms.

Certainly, to track and describe this new emergent state, we shall need the narratives of complex dynamical systems. Perhaps here science fact and science fiction are coming together to open our imaginations to the future and the possibilities of multidimensional modes of consciousness that can be both mystical and mathematical.”
William Irwin Thompson, TRANSFORMING HISTORY: A Curriculum for Cultural Evolution, Lindisfarne Books, 2001, p.188

Background:
What ‘Youth’?

Part 1
Part 2
3 May 2016

My Dinner with Bob & Carolyn | Andaz Maui at Wailea Resort



Payday

Listen
21 May 2016

President Trump | America’s New Boss

In 2017, President Trump swears to uphold the dignity of the office of president of the United States.

Get a look at the future greatness of America with The Onion founder Scott Dikkers’ new book Trump’s America.

“The world will change on the afternoon of January 20, 2017, a day that will forever be remembered as the day American became great again. Donald J Trump will stand in front of millions of adoring citizens and be formally sworn in as the 45th president of the United States. Men, women and children alike will weep at the greatness bestowed upon us.”

Inaugural Address by Donald J Trump (ROUGH DRAFT)

Thank you. Chief Justice (???????) …I want to thank the good people who voted for me. Fantastic job. You nailed it. You treated me very well. To be honest, it was an easy decision. But still, good for you.

The rest of you … Should I say it? Should I? Ok, I'll say it. You let us all down. What can I tell you?

(wait for Applause to die down) I'm honored to stand here today as your 45th president, stepping into the role that so many great men have filled. Well … they're not all great. Don’t get me wrong, some of them were good. But frankly most of them are overrated. I won’t get into details now, but a few were real losers.

But today isn’t about the mistakes of the past. It’s about me being President. Honestly, that's why we’re here, isn’t it? (Big applause here)

This Nation has seen better days. America is not a big moneymaker. I don’t need the money from this job, by the way. I can tell you that, it’s not a big deal. (ad lib how rich). Our country needs to start being smarter, making better deals. Iran is walking all over us. Mexico is eating our lunch. And China.

Beginning now we’re going to be winning. A lot. You’ve got good leadership now, so that’s a good start. I’ll turn this whole thing around so fast, it’ll make your head spin. We’re going to make America great again. Big league.

Thank you. You, been a wonderful crowd. Not the biggest crowd ever spoken to, but pretty big. Thank you.

From Trump’s America by Scott Dikkers

Has the Age of Quantum Computing Arrived | Coming to Your Phone in a Few Years



The Guardian
by Andrew Anthony

Quantum computing is the technology that many scientists, entrepreneurs and big businesses expect to provide a quantum leap into the future.

In the video above, Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau, details exactly what quantum computing means when he was asked by a reporter to explain quantum computing during a press conference at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Ontario (one of the world’s leading centres for the study of the field).

In the mysterious subatomic realm of quantum physics, particles can act like waves, so that they can be particle or wave or particle and wave. This is what’s known in quantum mechanics as superposition. As a result of superposition a qubit can be a 0 or 1 or 0 and 1. That means it can perform two equations at the same time. Two qubits can perform four equations. And three qubits can perform eight, and so on in an exponential expansion. That leads to some inconceivably large numbers, not to mention some mind-boggling working concepts.

Exactly how and why quantum physics adheres to these science-fiction like rules remains an issue of great speculation, but perhaps the most common theory is that the different quantum states exist in separate universes. The D-Wave quantum computer has one thousand qubits.

“A thousand qubit computer can be in 2 to the 1,000 states at one time, which is 10 to the 300th power,” says D-Wave’s CEO, Vern Brownell. “There’s only 10 to the 80th atoms in the universe. Now does this mean it’s in 10 to the 300th universes at the same time?”

Can billions of different universes coexist within one computer?

At the moment quantum computing still resides within a largely theoretical or speculative realm. The potential is staggering, involving a computational power many times the order of all the world’s existing classical computers combined.

D-Wave’s 2X computer costs more than $15m and only a handful of organisations have so far bought one. Still, as those organisations include Google, Lockheed Martin and Nasa, and among D-Wave’s investors are Amazon’s Jeff Bezos and the CIA’s hi-tech arm, In-Q-Tel, it’s clear that some of the world’s most forward-looking institutions believe that the computer has a future.

In areas such as artificial intelligence and cryptography, it’s thought that quantum computing will transform the landscape, perhaps bringing about the breakthrough that will enable machines to “think” with the nuance and interpretative skill of humans.

D-Wave’s vision is for a green revolution in computing, in which everyone will have access to much more energy-efficient quantum computers through the cloud. In a few years, Vern Brownell thinks, we’ll be able to access quantum computing from our phones. Read the entire article at The Guardian