Sunday, July 15, 2018

iON | Bob Dobbs’ Private Sessions


The New Coach House

21 January 2010
Session 239
James M, the Dragon, Greece, 9-11 Effect

17 January 2010
Session 238
James Joyce

16 January 2010
Session 237
First Session with iON

14 January 2010
Session 236
More on Haiti, the Concorde

13 January 2010
Session 235
Haiti Earthquake, Bending of Light, Golden Ratio in Matter

How Trump Manipulates Media to His Advantage



Thanks, Akito.

Peter Strzok Hearing | Who’s In Charge





Who Is America | Playing with Media



The Los Angeles Times

Sacha Baron Cohen, whom you may know better as Ali G, Borat Sagdiyev, Brüno Gehard and/or Admiral General Aladeen, returns to television Sunday night with the first in a seven-part Showtime series, Who Is America?

As in his previous works for the littler and bigger screens, Baron Cohen assumes a variety of disguises — not that many people would recognize him out of costume — in order to gull unsuspecting citizens into making fools of themselves.

The kind of asymmetrical improvisational comedy he practices, in which only one party understands the game, is not new or unique to Baron Cohen. It goes back to "Candid Camera," at least.

Some of Baron Cohen's guests, or whatever you want to call them, are (or lately were) public people involved in policy or punditry — lobbyists, talking heads. It seems fair to expose their willingness to endorse the star's absurd statements and proposals — a "Kinderguardians" program, for example, promoted by Baron Cohen as an Israeli security expert, with its child-friendly "puppy pistol" and "Uzi-corn" — or even just to point out their inability to spot an obvious faker.

More than a few such figures say ridiculous things publicly all the time without any help from a Baron Cohen, of course; if he's exposing anything, it's the mad eagerness some people have to go on television.

As in his previous works for the littler and bigger screens, Baron Cohen assumes a variety of disguises — not that many people would recognize him out of costume — in order to gull unsuspecting citizens into making fools of themselves.

In other cases the star is merely playing a fool in front of people whose only mistake is to treat him kindly. When, posing as a Trump-loving conspiracy theorist — the same character who issued the rebuttal alluded to above — he offers nonsensical solutions to income inequality and blames Obamacare for his "obese legs" and "chalky deposits," Sen. Bernie Sanders is patient and polite; more than that, he’s beside the point, a prop.

And when, in the guise of a cartoon granola liberal ("a cisgender white heterosexual male, for which I apologize") on a bike tour to heal a divided America, he sits down to dinner with a wealthy conservative couple, one is more impressed by their curiosity and friendly tolerance than anything Baron Cohen's character has to say, as he goes on about his wife having an affair with a dolphin and their daughter being made to menstruate on the flag. ("Honey, don't pass judgment," the woman says to her husband, as he is finally about to.)

In the remaining segment of the opening episode, Baron Cohen plays an ex-con ("I made one mistake — just 14 times") bringing his art, made from his bodily wastes and secretions, to a Laguna Beach art gallery. The woman who represents it is willing to take him more seriously than she should, perhaps — though, in fact, the drawings are not bad — and when he shows her a brush he has been assembling from the pubic hairs of famous artists (Banksy and Damien Hirst are the names he drops), she wonders, "Are you asking me for a sample?"

"That is so generous," he responds, and here, at least, he is telling the truth.



Saturday, July 14, 2018

The New Coach House


The New Coach House

“On July 29 [2017] I began to release the amazing new documents from my McLuhan File that have never been heard or seen before. Don't miss them if you’re interested in new territory scoped out in the McLuhan Quadrant …”
Bob Dobbs

2018

Part 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12
14 July

Part 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11
7 July

Part 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11
30 June

Part 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11
23 June

Part 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11
16 June

Part 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12
9 June

Friday, July 13, 2018

Do It for Denmark | A Solution for Denmark’s Falling Birth Rate





How Generation Z Will Change The World According To Experts

A Special Relationship Press Conference

Rwanda Reinvented as a Hip Tourist Spot

Mary Queen of Scots



Wikipedia

Mary, Queen of Scots, also known as Mary Stuart or Mary I, reigned over Scotland from 14 December 1542 to 24 July 1567. She was the mother of King James who sponsored the translation of the Bible into English that would later be named after him: the Authorised King James Version.

Mary Stuart, the only surviving legitimate child of King James V, was six days old when her father died and she acceded to the throne. She spent most of her childhood in France while Scotland was ruled by regents, and in 1558, she married the Dauphin of France, Francis. He ascended the French throne as King Francis II in 1559, and Mary briefly became queen consort of France, until his death in December 1560. Widowed, Mary returned to Scotland, arriving in Leith on 19 August 1561.

In November 1558, Henry VIII's elder daughter, Mary I of England, was succeeded by her only surviving sibling, Elizabeth I. Under the Third Succession Act, passed in 1543 by the Parliament of England, Elizabeth was recognised as her sister's heir, and Henry VIII's last will and testament had excluded the Stuarts from succeeding to the English throne. Yet, in the eyes of many Catholics, Elizabeth was illegitimate, and Mary Stuart, as the senior descendant of Henry VIII's elder sister, was the rightful queen of England. Henry II of France proclaimed his eldest son and daughter-in-law king and queen of England, and in France the royal arms of England were quartered with those of Francis and Mary. Mary's claim to the English throne was a perennial sticking point between her and Elizabeth I.

In July 1567, Mary was compelled to abdicate the throne in Scotland in favor of her infant son. In 1568, Mary escaped from Lochleven Castle. She raised an army but was soon defeated.

Mary then fled to England, where she sought Queen Elizabeth's protection. Instead of helping her cousin, Elizabeth imprisoned Mary. Mary's captivity would last for the next 18 years.

Since Mary was the great-granddaughter of King Henry VII and herself a Catholic, English Catholics plotted to get her onto the throne by assassinating Queen Elizabeth. Mary corresponded with one such plotter, Anthony Babington. When Elizabeth's spymaster uncovered the letters in 1586, Mary was brought to trial and found guilty of treason.

After Queen Elizabeth signed her cousin's death warrant, Mary, Queen of Scots was executed in Fotheringhay Castle, Northamptonshire, on February 8, 1587. She was 44 years old.
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